Johns Hopkins Medicine teams selects Nuance to reduce clinician burnout

Dragon Medical Advisor is one of two programs that will reduce physician burnout at John Hopkins Medicine

December 21, 2018
by John R. Fischer , Staff Reporter
Johns Hopkins Medicine has selected Nuance Communications to supply AI solutions for the advancement of “Joy at Johns Hopkins Medicine”.

A multi-year initiative for helping to reduce clinician and caregiver burnout, the program will now be equipped with Dragon Medical One and Dragon Medical Advisor, Nuance’s AI-powered clinical documentation systems for easing the documentation burden.

“Through Dragon Medical One and Dragon Medical Advisor, Nuance helps foster greater physician productivity and satisfaction, improves quality metrics for reporting and maximizes physician-patient interactions by easing the documentation burden on physicians," Michael Clark, senior vice president and general manager of provider solutions at Nuance, told HCB news. "Ultimately, the solutions allow clinicians to spend more time on what matters most — taking care of patients.”

About 51 percent of physicians felt burned out in 2017, a more than 40 percent increase from 2013, according to Medscape’s annual survey. Much of this feeling can be chalked up to stress from daily administrative tasks, with half of a physician’s day typically consumed by data entry, and only 27 percent of their time available to spend with patients.

The Joy in Medicine Task Force seeks to reduce this issue for clinicians by adopting support systems that can help them achieve professional goals and maximize their engagement with patients.

A HITRUST CSF-certified healthcare speech recognition platform hosted on Microsoft Azure, Dragon Medical One, enables physicians to dictate patient stories from anywhere at any time, thereby reducing the need to enter and document information manually and allowing them to interact with their patients for longer periods of time.

Dragon Medical Advisor is an in-workflow computer-assisted physician documentation (CAPD) solution that provides real-time advice to clinicians on the specificity of diagnoses so that encounters can be properly coded to accelerate billing, reduce denials and improve risk adjustment. The system’s enterprise-wide agreement also included Dragon Medical embedded in Epic Haiku and Canto to further optimize Johns Hopkins' Medical EHR and provide dictation options for clinicians on the move, and PowerMic Mobile for increased documentation mobility through a secure wireless microphone app.

“AI-powered solutions will play a large role in helping to improve both the clinician and patient experience,” said Clark. “They will augment clinicians' abilities, helping them to work smarter and more efficiently and to focus their time and expertise on more sophisticated activities, like direct patient care versus administrative tasks.”

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