Johnson & Johnson acquires Emerging Implant Technologies GmbH

September 14, 2018
by Thomas Dworetzky , Contributing Reporter
Johnson & Johnson Medical GmbH, a subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson Medical Devices Companies, has announced that it is acquiring privately-held Emerging Implant Technologies GmbH (EIT).

"Our goal is to offer a complete portfolio of interbody solutions that provides surgeons with even more options for the treatment of their patients," said Aldo Denti, Company Group Chairman of DePuy Synthes. "We are excited to welcome the skilled team at EIT, and together, we aspire to bring to market technologies that allow surgeons to perform spinal fusion procedures reliably and with consistent outcomes."

EIT, based in Wurmlingen, Germany, makes 3D-printed titanium interbody implants for spinal fusion surgery. These implants use a proprietary cellular titanium made of an open and interconnected porous structure that lets bone securely grow into the implant.

This deal will add to the interbody portfolio of products from DePuy Synthes, the orthopedics business of J&J, which includes expandable interbody devices, titanium-integrated PEEK technology and now 3D-printed cellular titanium, for both minimally-invasive and open spinal surgery.

The new technology fits in with other DePuy Synthes investments including recently introduced Concorde Lift expandable interbody device, and in the U.S., the PROTI 360° family of titanium-integrated interbody implants, which are used for degenerative disc disease.

Plans are for DePuy Synthes to maintain its focus on spinal disease best helped by surgery, including degenerative disc disease, deformity and complex cervical issues.

No financial details were disclosed.

In February, J&J made a move to bulk up its position in the robotic-assisted surgical market when it acquired Orthotaxy, a developer of software-enabled surgery technology, as part of a plan to develop a platform for a variety of care settings in orthopedics.

The purchase provides Johnson & Johnson access to Orthotaxy’s robotic-assisted surgery solution, a proprietary technology in early stage development for total and partial knee replacement, with the former intending to broaden its application for a range of orthopedic procedures and market it as a cost-effective, time-efficient and user-friendly product.

“Health care providers and surgeons are shifting from volume to value-based care and need technologies and solutions that help reduce costs, improve outcomes and enhance patient satisfaction,” Ciro Romer, company group chair of Johnson & Johnson’s orthopedic's business, DePuy Synthes, told HCB News. “In order for robotic-assisted surgery to continue to play a long-term role in this new environment, the technology must evolve from being a costly surgical add-on into part of a holistic platform that supports customers and patients throughout the episode of care.”

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